PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale Review

Super Smash Bros. Royale? Not quite.

We all know just how much PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale was compared with Nintendo’s Super Smash Bros. series before its release. And seriously, who can blame people for making the comparisons? Super Smash was clearly the inspiration- or competition- in Sony’s mind when they actually started working on the game. But while Nintendo’s Smash Bros. games are incredibly fun and absolute masterpieces, Battle Royale fails to impress in any way possible and comes across as bland and boring.

However, let’s get one thing out of the way first- PS All-Stars Battle Royale is actually very different from Smash Bros. Yes, Battle Royale brings together Sony mascots and pits them against each other in a wacky, charming kind of way (or at least attempts to) just as Smash Bros. does with Nintendo, but as a fighter, at its core, in the gameplay aspect, Battle Royale is actually more of a true, tactical fighter.

There’s a slew of options in Battle Royale to choose from. You can attack other characters using three of the face buttons, and change what the attacks result in by adding direction to them with the left analog stick. Add in elements like rolling, blocking, jumping, supers, combos, throws and so much more, and Battle Royale actually gets a bit too complex.

Now, don’t take this as some sign of me being a novice when it comes to fighters. I’m the kind of guy who loves playing games like Super Street Fighter and Marvel vs Capcom 3 for hours at length, but the thing is, being complex just doesn’t suit Battle Royale, and somehow, it doesn’t pull it off very well. The tutorials are all really good, but the game does have a steep learning curve. If this were just any other fighter, I’d have no problem with that. Hell, I’d expect it to have a steep learning curve.

But Battle Royale is, on the outside, a charming, accessible, fun, pick up and play fighter, boasting of the brand of fighting that would appeal to all crowds at the same time. The deep complexity of the hardcore fighting genre does not belong here.

What does belong is a great character roster, no matter what kind of fighter the game is. Unfortunately, Battle Royale’s roster is a hit and miss. While it includes some very lovable Sony characters like Nathan Drake and Kratos and Sackboy and even Fat Princess, the roster is small at just around twenty characters, and notable Sony icons like Nathan Halo or Sev are missing. And who’s to say you can only have the main Sony guys? I’d love to play as Sully or Ares or Captain Qwark. There are a few third party entries here, since, let’s face it, Sony’s character lineup does not (yet) have the depth that Nintendo’s does, and you’ll be seeing people like Raiden from Metal Gear Solid and Big Daddy from BioShock on the maps often.

And again, the problem arises- none of Sony’s characters are as iconic or as recognizable as, say, Mario or Pikachu. None of them have the rich history to themselves as Link does, and none of them has yet achieved the mysterious heights of Samus. It’s unfair, really, to criticize Battle Royale for something like this, but given its competition, it’s a necessity.

But make no mistake- once you see Kratos and Drake and Ratchet and Dante battling it out in PaRappa the Rapper’s dojo house, you’ll forget how not-so-iconic these characters are, because let’s face it- who doesn’t want to see Dante’a ass getting handed to him by Kratos, or Ratchet burying his weapons in Drake’s backside? Once you crank up the difficulty and actually get the hang of the controls and how to chain together some sweet combos, you actually start having fun.

When that starts getting repetitive- and it does, after a while- you can always jump online and beat the hell out of friends in local multiplayer or strangers around the world. Multiplayer, of course, is a hell lot of fun, and just like any other fighter, it’s in the multiplayer that Battle Royale’s strengths truly lie.

And the maps that we fight on are good enough to support all that crazy, chaotic fun- even enhance it. Maps, as you may have expected, are dynamic. So while in the middle of  fight, you’re probably worrying about your foes’ attacks and Level 1, 2 or 3 supers, you might also have to worry about the creepy huge girl in the background shooting huge, nuke sized missiles at the entire map to take out entire sections, or worry about disappearing and animating platforms. It’s really, really fun to see how the maps change and how you have to interact them to maybe even use them to your benefit. And getting to see maps from old games we love (or not so old games) and ones that haven’t even come out yet (BioShock Infinite’s Columbia) is always a treat.

It’s a shame, then, that the visuals can’t help these maps transcend to an all new level. The visuals, while perfectly serviceable, are rough and messy, and character models don’t look all that good. The soundtrack, too, is largely mediocre, with few memorable Sony themes recurring here.

In the end, nothing really works out well enough for PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale to achieve the heights it aspires to. Cross platform play between the Vita and the PS3 are neat and interesting mechanics, but none of what All-Stars does ever exceeds a level of mediocrity, and it always feels flat and… soulless. So while in technical terms, there’s not much wrong with Battle Royale, in the end, as a game, it fails to impress you.

This game was reviewed on the PS3.

The Good

Stages are excellent; Kratos vs Drake? Yes please; Online play is fun

The bad

Less than memorable soundtrack; Unimpressive visuals; Character roster is small and missing notable Sony characters; Too complex for its own good

Battle Royale tries to be a lot of things at once- wacky and hardcore, cute and violent, complex and accessible. In the end, it ends up being just mediocre.


  • http://www.facebook.com/pramathparijat Pramath Parijat

    Swing and a miss.
    The first Super Smash Bros. game was, in hindsight, mediocre. The series did not achieve true greatness until Melee hit two years later. While I don’t think Playstation All Stars will ever scale the same heights, I do think the sequel will be substantially better. We’ll see.

  • thedrwes

    Dude! Seriously, You don’t think Dante, or Kratos has gotten the rep to make them iconic. You are a Nintendo fanboy. Unlike Super Smash, this game will have downloadable content, and eventually the learning curve won’t matter, as time will fix that.

  • Reguzeeb

    It doesn’t take a Nintendo fan to realize something so obvious. It’s like saying the Tommy from The Rugrats is as iconic as Mickey Mouse. While popular, the character still doesn’t have the legacy and history that Mickey Mouse has. Mario has existed for 30 plus years, Dante is over 10 years old, and Kratos is little over 5. Not to mention the volume of games made by Mario. It’s just the facts.

  • ingus

    Couldn’t disagree with this review any more than I do…seems very subjective and personal instead of fair and objective

  • ThePokeMaster

    “”the problem arises- none of Sony’s characters are as iconic or as recognizable as, say, Mario or Pikachu.””

    I’m sorry- what? That is the dumbest thing I’ve read all day on the entire internet.

    They’re not even directly competing. They’re on two different platforms. Not releasing simultaneously on the same platforms. This isn’t COD vs Battlefield.

    It’s called “PlayStation All-Stars”. It’s meant for PlayStation fans and uses PlayStation characters. Did you expect non-PlayStation characters simply because they’re not 30 years old like Mario? So if a fighting game has entirely new/original characters you would consider it a complete failure because they’re unknown?
    GTFO

    You people need to let it be its own game.

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